Thursday, January 5, 2012

Polyculture vs. Monoculture

"Rabbi Meir used to say: He that studies Torah with a single teacher, to whom may he be likened? To one who had a single field, part of which he sowed with wheat and part with barley, and planted part with olives and part with oak trees. Now that man is full of good and blessing. But when one studies with two or three teachers he is like him who has many fields: one he sows with wheat and one he sows with barley, and plants one with olives and one with oak trees. Now this man's (attention) is divided among many pieces of land, without good or blessing."

Avos d'Rabbi Nasan Chapter 8

5 comments:

  1. Maybe... but aren't we told in Torah not to sow our field with two different kinds of grain?
    I see the attention divided thing-- good to have focus. Also good to have sufficient space for diversity.

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  2. Shalom and greetings - I have a request if you could please entertain it. I would prefer if you could please shoot me an email at my google account. It is most urgent. It is regarding a comment posted over 7 years ago that haunts me to this day wherein you referenced me by name. Is there an email address I could email you at to discuss this?

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  3. This is very urgent. Please.

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  4. Shalom and greetings - I have a request if you could please entertain it. I would prefer if you could please shoot me an email at my google account. It is most urgent. It is regarding a comment posted over 7 years ago that haunts me to this day wherein you referenced me by name. Is there an email address I could email you at to discuss this?

    ReplyDelete
  5. BS”D
    Discussion with Moishela (with his family)
    A Handicapped child 5775 #3
    20 Kislev 5775 (Dec 11, ‘14)

    (from: http://ladaat.info/showgil.aspx?par=20141227&gil=1713)

    “Why Are We Living”

    Time is moving on and we are definitely getting very close to the Geula Shelaima. I think every true Jew, whether he is close to Hashem or a bit farther away, feels now is the time that the world is going to change completely. The Frum, the believing Jew will feel a kind of closeness to Hashem that he never felt before, even though every morning when he gets up he can feel a strange and frightening foreboding of what’s going to be in the future.

    The Jew that is not so close to Hashem will also feel the fear and he will start thinking what this life is about. What do I have? What are my goals? What does it matter if I go to a football game or not? What does it matter if I get the job exactly that I want or get into the right university just right for me? What does it matter? What really matters in this life? All the entertainment? All the social life? What is life all about? Why are we living? Is it just one big accident, Chas Vesholom, an accident that brought us into life against our will to suffer, Chas Vesholom? The fear of what’s coming in the near future together with the suffering that we are already going through, are bringing some people, some Jews to question, at least to stop for a moment from their partying to ask what is this about, why is this happening.

    These questions are not usually asked here in Eretz Yisroel because w

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